all about wvs

explore this map to learn about some of the areas WVS has helped!

 

WVS were approached to help mery and her two cubs gita and zita who were discovered in an abandoned zoo in Armenia. They were very distressed, living off scraps and in a tiny cage.

WVS sent out a vet team to assess the lions and within 48 hours took on the project and they set on a mission to rescue them. 

First WVS worked with other organisations to build a rescue centre for the lions with plenty of space and a chance for them to behave more like wild lions.

Before the lions were moved they were given a sedative using a dart gun to make them sleep so they could be put into crates and moved.

The lions are now living in their new home in Armenia. Look at how happy they are now. 

Armenian Lions

MERY AND ONE OF HER CUBS GITA

GITA AND ZITA IN THE SMALL CAGES THEY WERE ABANDONED IN

the lions were sedated so they could be moved safely

the lions were carried in crates to their new home

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SEE WHERE ELSE WE HELP!

Our Thai Shelter

 

did you know that the call of a howler monkey can be heard by humans up to 5km away!

the howler monkeys in costa rica live with a hidden danger around them every day. electrocution is the number one killer of howler monkeys in costa rica. this is because there are many electrical power cables crisscrossing through the trees which the monkeys mistake for vines and branches.

meet vincent

Vincent became an orphan when his mother was killed on the power lines. Vincent was rescued and taken to a refuge. He cried a lot the first few days in his new home because he was injured and he missed his mother. At the refuge he got lots of love and care. Vincent made a great recovery and is a favourite amongst the medical staff. He loves to play, climb and wrestle with the other orphaned babies. He will stay at the refuge for 3 years until he is old enough to be returned to the wild.

WVS helps monkeys like vincent by providing life-saving equipment such as a new ultrasound machine and an incubator for the baby monkeys. 

Howler Monkeys

crossing the jungle along the power lines - a risky business!

baby howler monkeys in the orphanage

having fun in the howler monkey nursery

vincent

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doughnuts for donkeys

 

In northern Tanzania, donkeys pull carts full of bricks and sand. They work in searing heat for extremely long hours, seven days a week.

The yokes used to attach the carts are made from carved pieces of wood. These constantly press on the donkeys’ necks and cause terrible wounds.

The answer is simple - doughnuts. These padded fabric rings are attached to the wooden yoke, stopping it from rubbing on existing wounds and preventing new ones from forming. 

neck wounds

eva is 10 years old and lives with her 4 sisters and 3 brothers in northern Tanzania, Africa. She likes to go to school to learn about new things and her favourite subjects are Maths and Science. Her best friend is Neema. Her family live in the countryside, and she likes to help her mother fetch water from the local well, wash dishes and help her clean the house. She also loves playing ball with her friends. 

 

Eva’s family own 3 donkeys and Eva takes care of them by helping to take them to grazing points to feed and have water, and then to bring them home to the safety of their shelter at night. She says she likes the donkeys very much as they have helped her family build their house by carrying stones for the foundations, and bricks for the walls.  She also likes cows, sheep and goats.

meet eva

a doughnut in use under the wooden yoke

Tanzania Donkeys

donkeys being used to pull bricks

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